Evaluating Your Potential Work Space – The Interior

MiniMax Workshop Exterior
The MiniMax Workshop

If your potential workspace for a woodworking shop is outdoors, you should have already evaluated the exterior of the workshop as I talked about here. Obviously, it has to be in a condition that protects the interior space. That’s what I want to address next. For me, this means taking a look at the inside of my 10′ x 16′ (3m x 5m) garden shed and deciding what changes I’ll need to make to turn the space into a usable workshop.

After the garden shed was (mostly) cleaned out, I spent a lot of time inside planning and daydreaming. This is the only space I have available to indulge my woodworking hobby, so the struggle is between practicality and the ultimate shop. Do I make do with what I have, doing the best I can with the shed as-is or do I take the time (and a little expense) to make the space more comfortable and enjoyable? You can probably guess that I decided to go with option number two. I figured if I’m going to be spending any amount of time out there, it might as well be a place where I can relax and be comfortable. After all, my past workshops also served as my “mental therapy.” I could go into “my space” and relax, be creative, or just sit and think.

As I mentioned before, my shed was built by Tuff Shed, so I didn’t have any questions about the quality of construction. They used traditional construction techniques with 2×4 studs spaced at 16″ center-to-center. A conventional roof system with plywood sheathing and asphalt shingles was more than adequate.

MiniMax Workshop Raw Interior
Any outdoor building should have adequate air flow to prevent moisture buildup that can lead to rotting of the wood framing and sheathing.

At the top of the gable end walls near the peak of the roof, a vent was cut into the wall. I can’t stress enough how important this is. I made the mistake once of building a shed without vents. It started to rot from the inside out in a matter of months. I had completely ignored the fact that there has to be adequate air exchange between the inside and outside of the structure. Moisture can build up on the inside surfaces of the ceiling and walls. If you’re building an enclosed structure outdoors or having one built for you, be sure to provide adequate ventilation for proper air flow between the interior and exterior.

Looking at the interior space, I had to make the decision whether or not to add insulation. I’m in the southeastern U.S. so heating is not as much as a concern as cooling. If you decide you’ll want to add heat or air conditioning (or both) to your shop space, it’s a good idea to add insulation.

But there’s another factor that pushed me in the direction of adding insulation: Noise. My shed is near the property lines of the neighbors. I wanted to minimize the noise impact when I’m using power tools, especially in the evening hours.

As you progress toward getting your workspace ready to move into, start giving some thought to the layout of your work area. What tools are you going to need and how will they be arranged? How much floor real estate will these tools require? What about worksurfaces like benches and worktables? I’ve already decided that I want to run a workbench along the end wall (10′ or 3m). That will provide plenty of workspace to get started as I figure out how and where the rest of my tools and accessories will be stored. All of this plays into where you will install electrical receptacles later on. And you need to account for door openings and windows in the placement of equipment in your shop.

Get a sketchpad with grid lines and start sketching up possible ideas for your shop layout. Or do what I did–use SketchUp to create a 3D layout of your shop. You’ll appreciate it later.

MiniMax Workshop SketchUp Layout
Using a 3D modeling program like SketchUp can help you visualize how best to lay out the equipment in your shop.

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