Evaluating Your Potential Work Space – The Exterior

In this previous post, I mentioned several questions you need to ask when evaluating the space you would like to convert to a workshop. The first is whether the space is suitable as-is. In other words, can you set up shop in the space without making a lot of changes? If your workspace is located outdoors, you’ll have consider the suitability of the structure, as I did.

Taking a look at the exterior of my 10′ x 16′ (3m x 5m) garden shed, there is certainly some potential here. The shed was made by Tuff Shed. The nameplate above the door had a serial number on it, so I contacted Tuff Shed to see what I could find out about my particular shed. It was obviously an older model (more on that in a bit). The local Tuff Shed representative couldn’t provide any details. I suspect it was a smaller, common model sold through The Home Depot instead of one of the custom models that Tuff Shed is known for.

As I walked around the outside of the shed for the first time, some problems became apparent immediately. The bottom edges of the exterior siding were rotting away. I believe the main culprit is the lawn sprinkler system. As I watched the spray patterns from the sprinkler heads, one of them was directly hitting the side of the shed through it’s pattern cycle. Who knows how many years this has been going on. So, I realized that at some point I’ll need to repair the T-111 plywood siding or replace it.

Here in our southern climate, outbuildings need to be secured with hurricane anchors. On my shed, there is an anchor at each corner solidly bolted through the framing of the wall.

The shed walls are securely fastened to a galvanized steel base. I can’t really see under the shed, but I’m guessing the base consists of an outer frame with interior steel joists running the length of the shed. That’s another plus—I don’t need to worry about the floor framing rotting away or sagging over time. Vent holes in the sides of the floor frame provide adequate ventilation under the shed’s floor to prevent moisture build-up.

The lock on the double doors was missing one of a pair of keys. The local Tuff Shed representative gave me a replacement key once I gave him the lock number. The lock and latch system is robust and should last a lot of years.

And speaking of locks on doors, Tuff Shed’s door construction beats that of any shed I’ve ever seen. The doors are rock-solid and straight. I took a closer look at how the doors were constructed and realized their secret: The doors are braced with square aluminum tubing faced with 1/2″ plywood. I won’t need to be concerned about warping and twisting.

Overall, other than the rotting issue with the siding, I’m impressed with the construction of the shed.

Now it’s onto the inside of the shed to evaluate its condition for my new workshop.